a dreamy dream of a weekend at the family dry farm

Tuesday, August 2

I think we can just plan on this being a yearly thing I blog about. You can see my post about last year's trip up to our family's dry farm HERE, a place which is for sure, hands down, one of my favorite places in the whole entire world. Ririe, Idaho you old dog, you. It cannot be helped. I have photos of me and my sisters up here on this land when we were somewhere around 8,9 and 11 years old, during a summer week of back roads, and jeep rides, and climbing on old tractors. It's where my dad came to help HIS dad work. And where even my grandpa came to work with his dad. It's land that is rich in Adams history a beloved pillar of our childhood memories. My sweet sweet grandpa passed away early yesterday morning, yet the day before, knowing that we were headed up to the dry farm, had mustered up enough energy from his sick bed to call to my brother, "FIX THE FENCE!" Him and those giant, calloused, sun spotted grandpa hands of his loved this beautiful piece of land as a methodical and dedicated caretaker throughout his entire life. It means so much to all of us to spend time on it together, already steeping the next generation of memories. 

Just a coupla show offs right here. 

This little house is where my dad took his lunch breaks during his childhood summer workdays. He spoke with glowing fondness of sitting at the little table with the lunch my grandma had packed for him: tuna fish and spears of dill pickles between two thick slices of homemade bread slathered in butter. With his own personal bag of chips and a cold Pepsi.

And now here his pile of grandkids sit in the same house. Time is so funny.


Everett learned how to sling shot some rocks while we were there, which he got very good at, very quickly.

His reaction the second after he hit his target ...

It is every bit as peaceful as it looks. But 10x more incredible in person.

These are the newlyweds in an open display of rebellion after being coerced into a family vacation one week after getting married. No I'm kidding, they loooooooooved it. 

The ghost of camping past, here to cheerfully remind you of how rarely people wash their sleeping bags.
The very first of the raindrops on that fuzzy little head. 

And a hat to keep those pesky drops away.

 Idaho, we love you.

10 comments:

Josie said...

I love these pictures! They all made me smile. I'm so sorry to hear about your grandfather but these pictures are a lovely tribute to what he left for his family.

Krista P. said...

Sydney, where did you get your sandals? I'm looking for a good pair like that for running around that won't slip off my feet!

So sorry to hear about your Grandpa. Sounds like he was an amazing man. I love how close your family is. I'm close to mine, but you all seem so happy and really enjoy your time together. Puts a smile on my face :)

Martin Libossart Ruiz said...

Very nice pictures, so funny ;)

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NagaRaj Raj said...

nice

NagaRaj Raj said...

I really like your blog, it looks very nice, I'm happy to visit again to see your blog because it's very good indeed, thanks’ for all. it is wherein dad got here to help HIS dad paintings. And wherein even grandpa got here to work with his dad. I'm a professional resume writers it's land this is rich in Adams history a liked pillar of our formative years recollections. candy sweet grandpa passed away early the day gone by morning, yet the day earlier than, knowing that we had been headed up to the dry farm, had mustered up enough

Julia said...

I loved this post. It sounds like your grandpa was a wonderful man who will be dearly missed.

Amanda said...

No place better than Ririe, Idaho and the South Fork of the Snake. Its my dream location to retire and spend every day on the river.

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